Helpful Resources for Your Practice

GAZYVA Access Solutions offers a range of access and reimbursement resources for your patients and practice after GAZYVA is prescribed, including help with benefits investigations (BI), resources for prior authorizations (PA), sample billing and coding information, resources for denials and appeals, information about distribution and referrals to potential financial assistance options.

Coverage

Get help understanding insurance benefits and coverage, such as with benefits investigations and prior authorization resources

Benefits investigations
GAZYVA Access Solutions can conduct a benefits investigation (BI) which can determine:

  • If treatment is covered
  • If treatment is denied
  • If a prior authorization or pre-determination is required*
  • If your patient's insurance plan has a mandated or preferred SP

*If your patient’s request for a prior authorization is not granted, your GAZYVA Access Solutions Specialist can work with you to determine your next steps.

Option 1: Submit forms online

If your practice has a registered account for My Patient Solutions, you can get started by logging into your account.

Don't have an account?

  • An online tool to help you enroll patients in Gazyva Access Solutions and manage your service requests at your convenience.

Option 2: Print forms and fax or text

Step 1: Print one of the Patient Consent Forms below for your patient to complete.

Step 2: Print and complete the Prescriber Service Form below.

Step 3: Submit completed forms via fax or text.

Both forms are required. No action can be taken until a completed Patient Consent Form and Prescriber Service Form have been received. 

What to expect next:

  • The request will be processed within 5 business days upon receipt of both required forms
  • Your office will be contacted to discuss the application outcome and any next steps

The completion and submission of coverage- or reimbursement-related documentation are the responsibility of the patient and health care provider. Genentech makes no representation or guarantee concerning coverage or reimbursement for any service or item.


Reimbursement

Sample coding information and resources for denials and appeals

GAZYVA Sample coding

This coding information may assist you as you complete the payer forms for GAZYVA. These tables are provided for informational purposes only. Please visit CMS.gov or other payers’ websites to obtain additional guidance on their processes related to billing and coding.

Download sample coding and the important safety information for GAZYVA below.

Correct coding is the responsibility of the provider submitting the claim for the item or service. Please check with the payer to verify codes and special billing requirements. Genentech does not make any representation or guarantee concerning reimbursement or coverage for any service or item.

Appeals

If your patient’s health insurance plan has issued a denial, your GAZYVA Access Solutions Specialist can provide resources as you prepare an appeal submission, as per your patient’s plan requirements. 

If a plan issues a denial: 

  1. The denial should be reviewed, along with the health insurance plan’s guidelines to determine what to include in your patient’s appeal submission.
  2. Your GAZYVA Access Solutions Specialist has local payer coverage expertise and can help you determine specific requirements for your patient.

A sample appeal letter and additional considerations are available on the Practice Forms and Documents page.

Appeals cannot be completed or submitted by Genentech Access Solutions on your behalf.


Online patient enrollment

Submit GAZYVA Access Solutions forms and check the status of your service requests online using My Patient Solutions

My Patient Solutions is an online tool to help you enroll patients in GAZYVA Access Solutions and manage your service requests, all through one portal. It allows you the flexibility to work with GAZYVA Access Solutions when it’s convenient for you.

With My Patient Solutions, you can:

  • Enroll and re-enroll patients in financial assistance programs entirely online

  • Communicate with your GAZYVA Access Solutions Specialist

  • Easily identify next steps for service requests
  • 
View Benefits Investigation reports for all your enrolled patients
  • 
Follow up on prior authorizations or appeals
  • View co-pay assistance outcomes and referral information

How to register

Account registration can be completed by 1 person for the entire practice and for multiple practice locations. For help with registration or if you have questions, call GAZYVA Access Solutions at (866) 422-2377 (6AM-5PM PST, Monday through Friday).


GAZYVA Distribution

Genentech has contracted with a network of authorized specialty distributors and specialty pharmacies (SPs) to service practices choosing to prescribe GAZYVA. 

These partners have made a commitment to product integrity, and have agreed to distribute only products purchased directly from Genentech and not to distribute GAZYVA through secondary channels.

Authorized Distributors and Specialty Pharmacies 

Distributor Telephone Fax Web Orders
AmerisourceBergen Drug Corporation 844-222-2273 816-464-4140 www.amerisourcebergen.com/abc/
Cardinal Health Specialty Distribution 800-926-3161
270-219-6000 (KY)
501-707-2800 (AR)
N/A www.cardinal.com
Dakota Drug 866-210-5887 763-421-0661 www.dakdrug.com/ddos/
DMS Pharmaceutical 877-788-1100 847-518-1105 dmspharma.com/store.htm
McKesson US Pharmaceutical 855-625-4677
800-364-6198 (VA/DOD)
N/A connect.mckesson.com
Distributor Telephone Fax Web Orders
ASD Healthcare 800-746-6273 800-547-9413 www.asdhealthcare.com
Cardinal Health Specialty Distribution 866-860-3565 888-899-0063 www.biosolutionsdirect.com
Cardinal Health Specialty Distribution 800-926-3161 888-345-4916 specialtyonline.cardinalhealth.com
CuraScript SD 877-599-7748 800-862-6208 www.curascriptsd.com
McKesson Plasma and Biologics (MPB) 877-625-2566 888-752-7626 connect.mckesson.com
Morris & Dickson Specialty Distribution 800-710-6100 318-524-3096 www.mdspecialtydist.com
Distributor Telephone Fax Web Orders
BioSolutions Direct 866-860-3565 888-899-0063 www.biosolutionsdirect.com
Cardinal Health Specialty Distribution 877-453-3972 888-345-4916 specialtyonline.cardinalhealth.com
CuraScript SD 877-599-7748 800-862-6208 www.curascriptsd.com
McKesson Specialty Health 800-482-6700
855-477-9700
(Non-Oncology Customers)
800-289-9285 mscs.mckesson.com
Oncology Supply 800-633-7555 800-248-8205 www.oncologysupply.com
Distributor Telephone Fax Web Orders
ASD Healthcare 800-746-6273 800-547-9413 www.asdhealthcare.com
BioSolutions Direct 866-860-3565 888-899-0063 www.biosolutionsdirect.com
Cardinal Health Specialty Distribution 877-453-3972 888-345-4916 specialtyonline.cardinalhealth.com
CuraScript SD 877-599-7748 800-862-6208 www.curascriptsd.com
Humana Specialty Pharmacy 800-486-2668 877-405-7940 www.humanapharmacy.com/specialty
McKesson Specialty Health 800-482-6700
855-477-9700
(Non-Oncology Customers)
800-289-9285 mscs.mckesson.com
Distributor Telephone Fax Web Orders
Cardinal Health Puerto Rico 800-981-4699
787-625-4200
787-625-4398 N/A
Cesar Castillo 787-999-1616 787-720-1095 www.cesarcastillo.net

About Buy and Bill

With Buy and Bill, the practice purchases the medication in advance, then bills the patient's health insurance plan for reimbursement. The practice is responsible for storing and handling the drug as well as collecting the patient's co-pay for both the drug and its administration. With Buy and Bill, practices can maintain a stock of the drug, giving them the flexibility to treat patients when clinically appropriate.

About Specialty Pharmacies

GAZYVA Access Solutions works with specialty pharmacies (SPs) to help patients receive their prescribed Genentech medicines.

In addition to distributing medicines, an SP may provide the following services:

  • Reimbursement resources
  • Clinical services to support patients throughout their treatment
  • The ability to manage the specialty handling and shipping needs linked with many specialty therapies

You can work with your preferred SP or contact GAZYVA Access Solutions to learn which SP the patient’s health insurance plan mandates or prefers.

Genentech does not influence or advocate the use of any one specialty distributor or specialty pharmacy. We make no representation or guarantee of service or coverage of any item. For any product specific distribution questions call us at 1-877 (GENENTECH) 436-3683 (6AM-5PM PST, Monday through Friday).


Product issues

We are serious about patient safety. If your Genentech product is spoiled, expired, or damaged, we may be able to help you replace it.

Please contact Genentech Customer Service at (800) 551-2231 for any order or return-related questions.

Contact a representative

Questions about these resources?

A GAZYVA Access Solutions Specialist is ready to help. Call (888) 249-4918 (Mon.-Fri., 6AM-5PM PST, except major holidays)

Financial support

Financial Support

Find the right financial resources option for your patients.

  • We are open from 6AM-5PM PST, Mon. through Fri., except for the following holidays:

    • New Year's Day
    • Memorial Day
    • Independence Day
    • Labor Day
    • Thanksgiving Holiday (Thursday and Friday)
    • Christmas Day

Indications
GAZYVA® (obinutuzumab), in combination with chemotherapy followed by GAZYVA monotherapy in patients achieving at least a partial remission, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated stage II bulky, III or IV follicular lymphoma (FL).
 
GAZYVA® (obinutuzumab), in combination with bendamustine followed by GAZYVA monotherapy, is indicated for the treatment of patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) who relapsed after, or are refractory to, a rituximab-containing regimen.
 
GAZYVA® (obinutuzumab), in combination with chlorambucil, is indicated for the treatment of patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

 

BOXED WARNINGS: HEPATITIS B VIRUS REACTIVATION AND PROGRESSIVE MULTIFOCAL LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY

  • Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) reactivation, in some cases resulting in fulminant hepatitis, hepatic failure, and death, can occur in patients receiving CD20-directed cytolytic antibodies, including GAZYVA. Screen all patients for HBV infection before treatment initiation. Monitor HBV-positive patients during and after treatment with GAZYVA. Discontinue GAZYVA and concomitant medications in the event of HBV reactivation
  • Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) including fatal PML, can occur in patients receiving GAZYVA
 
Contraindications
  • GAZYVA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity reactions (eg, anaphylaxis) to obinutuzumab or to any of the excipients, or serum sickness with prior obinutuzumab use
 
Warnings and Precautions

Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation

  • Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation, in some cases resulting in fulminant hepatitis, hepatic failure, and death, can occur in patients treated with anti-CD20 antibodies including GAZYVA. HBV reactivation has been reported in patients who are hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive and in patients who are HBsAg negative but are hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) positive. Reactivation has also occurred in patients who appear to have resolved hepatitis B infection (ie, HBsAg negative, anti-HBc positive, and hepatitis B surface antibody [anti-HBs] positive)
  • HBV reactivation is defined as an abrupt increase in HBV replication manifesting as a rapid increase in serum HBV DNA level, or detection of HBsAg in a person who was previously HBsAg negative and anti-HBc positive. Reactivation of HBV replication is often followed by hepatitis, ie, increase in transaminase levels and, in severe cases, increase in bilirubin levels, liver failure, and death
  • Screen all patients for HBV infection by measuring HBsAg and anti-HBc before initiating treatment with GAZYVA. For patients who show evidence of hepatitis B infection (HBsAg positive [regardless of antibody status] or HBsAg negative but anti-HBc positive), consult healthcare providers with expertise in managing hepatitis B regarding monitoring and consideration for HBV antiviral therapy
  • Monitor patients with evidence of current or prior HBV infection for clinical and laboratory signs of hepatitis or HBV reactivation during and for several months following treatment with GAZYVA
  • In patients who develop reactivation of HBV while receiving GAZYVA, immediately discontinue GAZYVA and any concomitant chemotherapy and institute appropriate treatment. Resumption of GAZYVA in patients whose HBV reactivation resolves should be discussed with healthcare providers with expertise in managing hepatitis B. Insufficient data exist regarding the safety of resuming GAZYVA in patients who develop HBV reactivation

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML)

  • JC virus infection resulting in PML, which can be fatal, occurred in patients treated with GAZYVA. Consider the diagnosis of PML in any patient presenting with new onset or changes to preexisting neurologic manifestations. Evaluation of PML includes, but is not limited to, consultation with a neurologist, brain MRI, and lumbar puncture. Discontinue GAZYVA therapy and consider discontinuation or reduction of any concomitant chemotherapy or immunosuppressive therapy in patients who develop PML

Infusion-Related Reactions

  • GAZYVA can cause severe and life-threatening infusion-related reactions (IRRs). Sixty-five percent of patients with CLL experienced a reaction to the first 1,000 mg of GAZYVA infused. Thirty-seven percent of patients with relapsed or refractory NHL and 60% of patients with previously untreated NHL experienced a reaction on Day 1 of GAZYVA infusion. IRRs have occurred within 24 hours of receiving GAZYVA. IRRs can also occur with subsequent infusions. Symptoms may include hypotension, tachycardia, dyspnea, and respiratory symptoms (eg, bronchospasm, larynx and throat irritation, wheezing, and laryngeal edema). The most frequently reported symptoms include nausea, fatigue, chest discomfort, dyspnea, dizziness, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, hypertension, hypotension, flushing, headache, pyrexia, and chills
  • Premedicate patients with acetaminophen, an antihistamine, and a glucocorticoid. Closely monitor patients during the entire infusion. Reduce infusion rate, interrupt infusion or permanently discontinue GAZYVA for IRRs based on severity. Institute medical management (eg, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, bronchodilators, and/or oxygen) for IRRs as needed
  • For patients with preexisting cardiac or pulmonary conditions, monitor more frequently throughout the infusion and the post-infusion period since they may be at greater risk of experiencing more severe reactions. Hypotension may occur as part of the GAZYVA infusion-related reaction. Consider withholding antihypertensive treatments for 12 hours prior to, during each GAZYVA infusion, and for the first hour after administration until blood pressure is stable. For patients at increased risk of hypertensive crisis, consider the benefits versus the risks of withholding their antihypertensive medication

Hypersensitivity Reactions Including Serum Sickness

  • Hypersensitivity reactions have been reported in patients treated with GAZYVA. Signs of immediate-onset hypersensitivity included dyspnea, bronchospasm, hypotension, urticaria and tachycardia. Late-onset hypersensitivity diagnosed as serum sickness has also been reported, with symptoms that include chest pain, diffuse arthralgia and fever. Hypersensitivity reactions may be difficult to clinically distinguish from infusion-related reactions. However, hypersensitivity very rarely occurs with the first infusion and, when observed, often occurs after previous exposure
  • If a hypersensitivity reaction is suspected during or after an infusion, stop the infusion and permanently discontinue treatment. GAZYVA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity reactions to GAZYVA, including serum sickness with prior obinutuzumab use

Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS)

  • Tumor lysis syndrome, including fatal cases, has been reported in patients receiving GAZYVA. Patients with high tumor burden, high circulating lymphocyte count (>25 x 109/L) or renal impairment are at greater risk for TLS
  • Administer appropriate tumor lysis prophylaxis with antihyperuricemics (eg, allopurinol or rasburicase) and hydration prior to the infusion of GAZYVA for patients at risk for TLS. During the initial days of GAZYVA treatment, monitor the laboratory parameters of patients considered at risk for TLS. For treatment of TLS, correct electrolyte abnormalities, monitor renal function and fluid balance, and administer supportive care, including dialysis as indicated

Infections

  • Fatal and serious bacterial, fungal, and new or reactivated viral infections can occur during and following GAZYVA therapy. When GAZYVA is administered with chemotherapy followed by GAZYVA monotherapy, Grade 3 to 5 infections have been reported in up to 8% of patients during combination therapy, up to 13% of patients during monotherapy, and up to 8% of patients after treatment
  • In GALLIUM, more Grade 3 to 5 infections were reported in the recipients of GAZYVA and bendamustine (117/410 patients, 29%), as compared to GAZYVA plus CHOP or CVP (43/281 patients, 15%). More fatal infections were reported in patients treated with GAZYVA and bendamustine (3%), as compared to GAZYVA plus CHOP or CVP (<1%), including during the monotherapy phase and after completion of treatment
  • Do not administer GAZYVA to patients with an active infection. Patients with a history of recurring or chronic infections may be at increased risk of infection

Neutropenia

  • Severe and life-threatening neutropenia, including febrile neutropenia, has been reported during treatment with GAZYVA. Monitor patients with Grade 3 to 4 neutropenia frequently with regular laboratory tests until resolution. Anticipate, evaluate, and treat any symptoms or signs of developing infection. Consider dose delays for Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. Consider administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (GCSF) in patients with Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia
  • Neutropenia can also be of late onset (occurring more than 28 days after completion of treatment) and/or prolonged (lasting longer than 28 days)
  • Patients with severe and long lasting (>1 week) neutropenia are strongly recommended to receive antimicrobial prophylaxis until resolution of neutropenia to Grade 1 or 2. Consider antiviral and antifungal prophylaxis

Thrombocytopenia

  • Severe and life-threatening thrombocytopenia has been reported during treatment with GAZYVA in combination with chemotherapy. Fatal hemorrhagic events have been reported in patients with NHL treated with GAZYVA in combination with chemotherapy, including during Cycle 1
  • Monitor all patients frequently for thrombocytopenia and hemorrhagic events, especially during the first cycle. In patients with Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia, monitor platelet counts more frequently until resolution and consider dose delays of GAZYVA and chemotherapy or dose reductions of chemotherapy. Transfusion of blood products (ie, platelet transfusion) may be necessary. Consider withholding concomitant medications that may increase bleeding risk (platelet inhibitors or anticoagulants), especially during the first cycle

Immunization

  • The safety and efficacy of immunization with live or attenuated viral vaccines during or following GAZYVA therapy have not been studied. Immunization with live virus vaccines is not recommended during treatment and until B-cell recovery

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

  • Based on its mechanism of action and findings in animals, GAZYVA can cause B-cell depletion in infants exposed to obinutuzumab in-utero. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Mothers who have been exposed to GAZYVA during pregnancy should discuss the safety and timing of live virus vaccinations for their infants with their child’s healthcare providers. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception while receiving GAZYVA and for 6 months after the last dose

Lactation

  • Human IgG is known to be present in human milk. Because of the potential of serious adverse reactions in the breastfed child, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with GAZYVA and for 6 months after the last dose

Geriatric Use

  • Of 336 patients with previously untreated CLL who received GAZYVA in combination with chlorambucil, 81% were 65 years and older, while 46% were 75 and older. Of the patients 75 years and older, 46% experienced serious adverse reactions and 7% experienced adverse reactions leading to death. Of the patients younger than 75, 33% experienced a serious adverse reaction and 2% an adverse reaction leading to death. No significant differences in efficacy were observed between younger and older patients
  • Of 204 patients in GADOLIN with relapsed or refractory NHL treated with GAZYVA plus bendamustine, 44% were 65 and over, while 14% were 75 and over. In patients 65 and over, 55% of patients experienced serious adverse reactions and 28% experienced adverse reactions leading to treatment withdrawal while in patients under 65, 37% and 14% experienced serious adverse reactions and adverse reactions leading to treatment withdrawal, respectively. No clinically meaningful differences in efficacy were observed between these patients and younger patients in GADOLIN
  • Of the 691 patients in GALLIUM treated with GAZYVA plus chemotherapy as first-line therapy, 33% were 65 and over, while 7% were 75 and over. Of patients 65 and over, 63% experienced serious adverse reactions and 26% experienced adverse reactions leading to treatment withdrawal, while in patients under 65, 43% experienced serious adverse reactions and 13% had an adverse reaction leading to treatment withdrawal. No clinically meaningful differences in efficacy were observed between these patients and younger patients
     
Additional Important Safety Information

Previously Untreated CLL

  • The most common Grade 3 to 4 adverse reactions (incidence ≥10%) observed in patients with CLL in the GAZYVA containing arm were neutropenia, infusion-related reactions, and thrombocytopenia

  • The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥10%) observed in patients with CLL in the GAZYVA containing arm were infusion-related reactions, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and diarrhea

  • Adverse reactions rates and laboratory abnormalities from the Stage 2 phase are consistent with the rates in Stage 1. In addition to the adverse reactions observed in Stage 2, in Stage 1 back pain (5% vs 2%), anemia (12% vs 10%) and cough (10% vs 7%) were observed at a higher incidence in the GAZYVA treated patients. The incidence of Grade 3 to 4 back pain (<1% vs 0%), cough (0% vs <1%) and anemia (5% vs 4%) was similar in both treatment arms. With regard to laboratory abnormalities, in Stage 1 hyperkalemia (33% vs 18%), creatinine increased (30% vs 20%) and alkaline phosphatase increased (18% vs 11%) were observed at a higher incidence in patients treated with GAZYVA with similar incidences of Grade 3 to 4 abnormalities between the two arms

Relapsed/Refractory NHL

  • The GADOLIN study evaluated safety in 407 patients with relapsed or refractory NHL, including FL (81%), small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) (a disease for which GAZYVA is not indicated), who did not respond to or progressed within 6 months of treatment with rituximab product or a rituximab product-containing regimen. In patients with follicular lymphoma, the profile of adverse reactions was consistent with the overall NHL population

  • Serious adverse reactions occurred in 45% of the GAZYVA arm and 37% of the bendamustine-only arm. Fatal adverse reactions within 90 days of treatment occurred in 3.4% and 2.5%, respectively. Throughout follow-up, fatal adverse reactions occurred in 10% of GAZYVA recipients and in 7.4% of recipients of bendamustine alone, with infection and second primary malignancies being the leading causes

  • The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥20%) in GAZYVA recipients included infusion-related reactions, fatigue, neutropenia, cough, upper respiratory tract infections, and musculoskeletal pain

  • During GAZYVA monotherapy (158 patients), adverse reactions in ≥10% of patients included upper and lower respiratory tract infections, cough, neutropenia, musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, diarrhea, rash, and urinary tract infection

  • In the GAZYVA monotherapy phase, new or worsening Grade 3 or 4 abnormalities included neutropenia in 25% of patients (Grade 4, 10%) and lymphopenia in 23% (Grade 4, 5%)

Previously Untreated NHL

  • A randomized, open-label multicenter trial (GALLIUM) evaluated the safety of GAZYVA as compared to rituximab product in 1,385 patients with previously untreated follicular lymphoma (86%) or marginal zone lymphoma (14%)
  • Serious adverse reactions occurred in 50% of patients on the GAZYVA arm and 43% of patients on the rituximab product arm. Fatal adverse reactions were reported during treatment in 3% in the GAZYVA arm and 2% in the rituximab product arm, most often from infections in the GAZYVA arm. During treatment and follow-up combined, fatal adverse reactions were reported in 5% of the GAZYVA arm and 4% of the rituximab product arm, with infections and second malignancies being leading causes. In the GAZYVA arm, fatal infections occurred in 2% of patients compared to <1% in the rituximab product arm
  • Neutropenia, infusion-related reactions, febrile neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were the most common Grade 3 to 5 adverse reactions (incidence ≥5%) observed more frequently in the GAZYVA arm
  • Throughout treatment and follow-up, the most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥20%) observed at least 2% more in the GAZYVA arm were infusion-related reactions (72%), neutropenia (53%), upper respiratory tract infection (50%), cough (35%), constipation (32%) and diarrhea (30%)
  • During the monotherapy period, the common adverse reactions (incidence ≥10%) observed at least 2% more with GAZYVA were upper respiratory infection (40%), cough (23%), musculoskeletal pain (20%), neutropenia (19%) and herpesvirus infection (13%)

 

You are encouraged to report side effects to Genentech and the FDA. You may contact Genentech by calling 1-888-835-2555. You may contact the FDA by visiting www.fda.gov/medwatch, or calling 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see the full Prescribing Information for additional Important Safety Information, including BOXED WARNINGS.

    • GAZYVA full Prescribing Information. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc.; 2021.

      GAZYVA full Prescribing Information. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc.; 2021.

    • Mössner E, Brünker P, Moser S, et al. Increasing the efficacy of CD20 antibody therapy through the engineering of a new type II anti-CD20 antibody with enhanced direct and immune effector cell–mediated B-cell cytotoxicity. Blood. 2010;115(22):4393-4402.

      Mössner E, Brünker P, Moser S, et al. Increasing the efficacy of CD20 antibody therapy through the engineering of a new type II anti-CD20 antibody with enhanced direct and immune effector cell–mediated B-cell cytotoxicity. Blood. 2010;115(22):4393-4402.

    • Herter S, Herting F, Mundigl O, et al. Preclinical activity of the type II CD20 antibody GA101 (obinutuzumab) compared with rituximab and ofatumumab in vitro and in xenograft models. Mol Cancer Ther. 2013;12(10):2031-2042.

      Herter S, Herting F, Mundigl O, et al. Preclinical activity of the type II CD20 antibody GA101 (obinutuzumab) compared with rituximab and ofatumumab in vitro and in xenograft models. Mol Cancer Ther. 2013;12(10):2031-2042.

    • Klein C, Lammens A, Schäfer W, et al. Epitope interactions of monoclonal antibodies targeting CD20 and their relationship to functional properties. mAbs. 2013;5(1):22-33.

      Klein C, Lammens A, Schäfer W, et al. Epitope interactions of monoclonal antibodies targeting CD20 and their relationship to functional properties. mAbs. 2013;5(1):22-33.

    • Honeychurch J, Alduaij W, Azizyan M, et al. Antibody-induced nonapoptotic cell death in human lymphoma and leukemia cells is mediated through a novel reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway. Blood. 2012;119(15):3523-3533.

      Honeychurch J, Alduaij W, Azizyan M, et al. Antibody-induced nonapoptotic cell death in human lymphoma and leukemia cells is mediated through a novel reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway. Blood. 2012;119(15):3523-3533.

    • VENCLEXTA® (venetoclax tablets) Prescribing Information. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc; 2019.

      VENCLEXTA® (venetoclax tablets) Prescribing Information. North Chicago, IL: AbbVie Inc; 2019.

    • CALQUENCE® (acalabrutinib) Prescribing Information. Wilmington, DE: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP; 2019.

      CALQUENCE® (acalabrutinib) Prescribing Information. Wilmington, DE: AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP; 2019.

    • IMBRUVICA® (ibrutinib) Prescribing Information. Horsham, PA: Janssen Biotech, Inc.; 2019.

      IMBRUVICA® (ibrutinib) Prescribing Information. Horsham, PA: Janssen Biotech, Inc.; 2019.

    • Data on file. Genentech, Inc.

      Data on file. Genentech, Inc.

    • Seymour JF, Marcus R, Davies A, et al. Haematologica. 2019;104(6):1202-1208.

      Seymour JF, Marcus R, Davies A, et al. Haematologica. 2019;104(6):1202-1208.

    • Casulo C, Byrtek M, Dawson KL, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2015;33(23):2516-2522.

      Casulo C, Byrtek M, Dawson KL, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2015;33(23):2516-2522.